Men In White

Stop press! Men In White, the history of Singapore's ruling People's Action Party, has been flying off the shelves of local bookstores and a third printing of 10,000 copies has been ordered, reports the Straits Times.

Er, wouldn't it be better to correct a few spelling mistakes and grammatical errors first?

There are mistakes even in the foreword written by Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew. For a gifted writer like him, it is uncharacteristic to slip up like this:

"The SPH team interviewed many of the surviving players and read their oral histories, including of those who had passed away."

Surely, he meant:

"The SPH team interviewed many of the surviving players and read their oral histories – as well as of those who had passed away."

And this must be a typo. The Minister Mentor writes:

"The writers have given a comprehensive picture of the events since the 1950s when a group of returning students from Britain conceived the idea of a new socialist-styled political party."

Surely, he meant "a new socialist-style party".

Who read the proofs?

The Straits Times publisher, Singapore Press Holdings, which published this book written by three of its  journalists, will do well to order a thorough revision before printing any more copies.

Careless mistakes may be excused in a potboiler. But this is history written for posterity. The bar has to be higher.

There seems to be a mistake even  on the first page of the first chapter of this book. Sonny Yap writes:

"But get to know Chan Sun Wing better and banter with him in his native Cantonese and he will tell you in a heart-wrenching manner that home was not Bang Lang or Hatyai but Singapore."

There is no such word as "heart-wrenching" in my copy of the Oxford Dictionary of English. But it offers a substitute: "heart-rending".

I did not pause to note down every howler but was amused by the spelling mistake made by Richard Lim while describing his former boss, Lim Kim San.

"In 2003, in his office in Singapore Press Holdings' News Centre in Toa Payoh, the still spritely 87-year-old said: 'We've got to make room for new blood and fresh ideas to succeed us if Singapore is to succeed.'…" (page 360)

A man may remain "sprightly" in his old age, but he is highly unlikely to turn into a "sprite" – an elf or a fairy.

The mistakes look like simple carelessness by gifted writers, for this is an ambitious, well-written book.

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